ARTILLERY MAGAZINE: CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY PHYLLIS GREEN BY ANNABEL OSBERG

Spiritual aspirations present this fundamental dilemma: we exist as physical beings in a material world of far more palpable empirical reality than anything incorporeal, with pragmatic demands inevitably more urgent than intangibles. Without surplus resources, how does one afford the time to meditate, the money for yoga classes, or the peace of mind to entertain any such immaterial considerations?  Phyllis Green’s work evokes this timeless tug-of-war between concrete and supernatural. Sidestepping cynicism and camp, Green creates objects appearing evenly suspended at the fortuitous fulcrum where material luxury meets spiritual fulfillment.

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ART AND CAKE: PHYLLIS GREEN AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY BY JODY ZELLEN

In “Life after Life after Life” Phillis Green presents an array of objects —some are wearable, suspended from the ceiling on hand crafted wooden supports that look like walking sticks— others are sculptures on casters that can be repositioned and moved around the gallery space alluding the the idea that nothing is static or stationary. Even an image of a cloud filled sky, entitled “Sky Shade,” 2016 has moving parts. That these objects are in flux challenges the traditional notion of a static exhibition and this is exactly Green’s intention. In this body of work, she is suggesting things change and has fashioned an exhibition that connects the material and spiritual worlds.

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LOS ANGELES TIMES: WHEN CLOTHES ARE MORE THAN CLOTHES: PHYLLIS GREEN'S DESIGNS ARE JOURNEYS, HUNG ON A HANGAR BY LEAH OLLMAN

Form and function are familiar enough allies. Phyllis Green pairs function and fuel in her subtly provocative show at Chimento Contemporary. Her clothing and furnishings provide ignition for the spirit.

A dark khaki raincoat hanging in a far corner of the gallery is the most resonant example. Beltless and buttonless, the stripped-down garment is all business on the outside. Inside, it is lined with white feathers that peek out of the bottom of both sleeves and along the hem. The feathers sound a lyrical note, and they invite the wearer to think metaphorically about loft, buoyancy, elevation. Green's title: "Close your eyes and feel peace. Open them and ask what can I do to make this world better." The coat is nothing less than a uniform for transformation, outerwear to encourage inner growth.

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LOS ANGELES TIMES: DATEBOOK: CALIFORNIA'S MYTHICAL ROOTS, LAYERED HISTORIES OF THE SLAVE TRADE, MACHINES FOR ENLIGHTENMENT BY CAROLINA A. MIRANDA

Phyllis Green, “Life after Life after Life,” at Chimento Contemporary. The L.A.-based artist has created a series of “machines for enlightenment” designed to help with the search for truth. This includes a series of furniture-like sculptures, as well as simple sheaths that are intended to be worn during such a journey — their colors inspired by Hindu thought;

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WASHINGTON CITY PAPER: HOW THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS ASSEMBLED NEARLY 500 WOMEN ARTISTS FOR A HISTORIC PHOTO; KIM SCHOENSTADT'S "NOW BE HERE" PROJECT COMES TO D.C. BY JEANINE SANTUCCI

Kim Schoenstadt began the Now Be Here project in her home city of Los Angeles in August of 2016. She got the idea to showcase the number of women artists living and working in cities where they are not equally represented in museums and galleries. Since then, Now Be Here has been replicated in three cities—New York City, Miami, and now D.C.—with a total of 2,070 artists participating.

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DELICIOUS LINE: JULIE WEITZ: THE HAND NETWORK, HUMDOG A PRELUDE, CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY BY JEFF HANSEN

Julie Weitz's The Hand Network, HUMDOG a prelude, a multimedia video project involving choreographed sculpture, cinematography, and a scored soundtrack. The work gives voice to the writings of Carmen "humdog" Hermosillo, a controversial Cuban-American essayist and important figure of cybernetic history and internet subculture.

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THE WASHINGTON POST:
STAND UP AND BE COUNTED: HUNDREDS OF CONTEMPORARY FEMALE ARTISTS PARTICIPATE IN HISTORIC PHOTO

Hoping to bring attention to the region’s vibrant arts scene, almost 500 female contemporary artists gathered at the National Museum of Women in the Arts on Wednesday night for a historic group photograph.

Conceived by Los Angeles-based artist Kim Schoenstadt in collaboration with D.C. artist Linn Meyers, “Now Be Here #4″ is the latest in gatherings of “female and female-identifying visual artists in the local community,” according to the project’s website. Previous gatherings occurred in L.A., New York and Miami last year.

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WALL STREET INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE: JULIE WEITZ AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY

Julie Weitz casts original sculptures and employs practical film effects to construct a virtual world devoid of bodies but filled with the desire for touch in her highly sensualized aesthetic. A network of phantom limbs made from molds of the artist’s hands are linked together by metal chains, a mouth emerges from darkness oozing white foam; a phallus made of wax rotates in blinking neon and a plaster bust of the goddess Athena radiates pink light from her eyes: the imagery permeates a palpable, erotic terror.

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 Image courtesy of Julie Weitz and Chimento Contemporary

Image courtesy of Julie Weitz and Chimento Contemporary

 

ART AND CAKE: CONDUCTION AT FELLOWS OF CONTEMPORARY ART (FOCA) BY LORRAINE HEITZMA

In the center of the gallery, Phyllis Green’s Veil, stands like an exotic sentinel. In fact it is a costume draped over an armature on wheels, allowing a participant to don the elaborate veil while remaining mobile.  A Sanskrit Vedic text used in teaching Hindu spiritual knowledge inspired Veil.  Specifically it refers to the advice to approach one’s guru with wood on your head.  Green’s sculpture aids the individual who is seeking detachment and her performance, Detachment, demonstrates its use in a series of actions within the gallery.

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ARTILLERY MAGAZINE PICK OF THE WEEK: MONIQUE PRIETO

Monique Prieto‘s new paintings radiate magnetic simplicity. The abstractions in her elegantly spare show, “Luster,” glow as though lit from within. Each of the four diptychs currently on view at Chimento Contemporary features a pair of organic shapes, one on each panel.

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MCCASLIN ART ADVISORY: WORLD PREMIERE IN BERLIN ART WEEK

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ART AND CAKE, "MONIQUE PRIETO AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY"

Abstract paintings draw viewers’ attention to the surface, gleaning content and narrative not from representation, but from the exchange between color, brushstroke, and texture. In “Luster”, Monique Prieto’s current solo exhibition at Chimento Contemporary, these essential ingredients coalesce to generate pleasing and layered pieces, but pieces that are nonetheless susceptible to both benefit and suffer from the ambiguity of abstraction.

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LA TIMES, "MONIQUE PRIETO AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY: FINDING A FACE IN THE CLOUDS" BY DAVID PAGEL

Last year, Monique Prieto exhibited six pairs of little paintings, each resembling an abstract ear and all brought together under the title “Good Listening.” The intimate diptychs suggested an artist listening to her inner rumblings while she let the world around her become the background music to her musings.

This year, it’s clear that those exploratory abstractions were also seeds. They have sprouted and blossomed into the four diptychs that make up the L.A. painter’s current exhibition at Chimento Contemporary in Boyle Heights.

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ART NEWS: MONIQUE PRIETO AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY, LOS ANGELES

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 Julie Weitz,  The Hand Network: Humdog, a prelude   ,   HD video, 6:20, 2017

Julie Weitz, The Hand Network: Humdog, a preludeHD video, 6:20, 2017

CURATE.LA: JULIE WEITZ THE HAND NETWORK: HUMDOG A PRELUDE & MONIQUE PRIETO: LUSTER

Julie Weitz casts original sculptures and employs practical film effects to construct a virtual world devoid of bodies but filled with the desire for touch in her highly sensualized aesthetic. A network of phantom limbs made from molds of the artist’s hands are linked together by metal chains, a mouth emerges from darkness oozing white foam; a phallus made of wax rotates in blinking neon and a plaster bust of the goddess Athena radiates pink light from her eyes: the imagery permeates a palpable, erotic terror.II For Luster, Prieto has shifted key elements of her formal lexicon of shape, line, and color into new structural configurations that represent both a break from and direct evolution of her signature style of figurative abstraction.

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ARTILLERY MAG: DECODER: PENISES: 1850 - 2017BY ZAK SMITH

“Regrettably, the provocative nature of your content is likely unsuitable for our audience at this time.” It may shock you to discover that artists still get told this. It may shock you to discover that—in the fine arts, in Los Angeles, California, in 2017—shock still exists. After all the slutwalking and Vagina Monologuing and pussy-grabbing, pointing the public’s antenna toward the thing their parents did to make them is still, for the individual artist, a gamble. Not a disqualifier, but one more reason the check might not come through.

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CHRIS FINLEY INCLUDED IN DOUG SIMAY'S BEST PICKS

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CONTEMPORARY ART REVIEW LA: THE DICK PIC SHOW AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY BY ANGELLA D'AVIGNON

Foucault’s “repressive hypothesis” supposes forbidden pleasure makes sex feel transgressive and taboo. So it’s appropriate that The Dick Pic Show, curated by Katie Bode and Kenton Parker, is installed in Chimento Gallery’s small, brick-walled bathroom—a fun, lewd locale that suggests a type of kinky voyeurism or public sexual activity. Hung salon-style, the show is neither overwhelming nor precious, despite its long roster of 37 artists. The contemporary dick pic—solicitous, intimate, warranted or unwarranted—is the pariah of online dating, just as the symbol of the phallus is ubiquitous and omnipotent in art historical contexts. From subtle innuendos to brazen representations, each artist’s perspective on the trope of the dick pic reflects the notion that sexuality is fluid, subjective, and highly personal.

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KCRW: CHRIS FINLEY, BENJAMIN WEISSMAN AND CINDY BERNARD BY HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP

One of the many downsides to a market-driven contemporary art scene is the shortage of options for mid-career, middle-aged artists. Artists who had a burst of support when first out of art schools can fade from view for any number of personal reasons: teaching, raising a family, moving away from the big city, shifts in priorities and focus. Three shows in L.A. give such artists another chance and in every case, it proves a good gamble.

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LA TIMES: THE STOMACH-CHURNING, VISCERAL POWER OF CHRIS FINLEY'S WEIGHTLIFTER PORTRAITS BY DAVID PAGEL

ARTISTS DO ALL SORTS OF HEAVY LIFTING, OFTEN IN WAYS THAT WE LEAST EXPECT.

THAT’S WHAT HAPPENS IN CHRIS FINLEY’S “DROOL, SNATCH, CLEAN AND JERK,” AN EXHIBITION OF SEVEN ODDLY POWERFUL PAINTINGS AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY IN BOYLE HEIGHTS. AT ONCE UNSETTLING AND ENGAGING — UGLY AND BEAUTIFUL — FINLEY’S PICTURES BRING US FACE TO FACE WITH WEIGHTLIFTERS AS THEY DO SOME REAL HEAVY LIFTING.

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MENS HEALTH: HOW DOES YOUR ‘GYM FACE’ MATCH UP TO THESE CRAZY PORTRAITS? BY ALISA HRUSTIC  

YOUR BODY REACTS IN ALL SORTS OF STRANGE AND COMPLICATED WAYS WHEN YOU’RE LIFTING HEAVY— AND YOUR FACE IS NO EXCEPTION. THE “GYM FACE” IS NEVER REALLY PLEASANT TO LOOK AT OR EXPERIENCE: YOUR FOREHEAD IS DRIPPING SWEAT, YOUR MOUTH IS PULLED INTO A TIGHT GRIMACE, LIPS SNARLING, AS IF YOU’RE READY TO IMPLODE.

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ARTSCENE: CHRIS FINLEY REVIEW BY GENIE DAVIS

Chris Finley’s "Drool, Snatch, Clean and Jerk" presents fractured faces — and some not so fractured — evocative of Picasso, the subject of which is weightlifting. Distorted and visceral, Finley focuses our visual attention on Olympic weightlifters poised in intense moments of exertion, performing the snatch as well as the clean and jerk. For those not versed in lifting terminology, the snatch is a continuous motion event involving lifting the barbell; the clean and jerk creates two lifting movements.

Read more here & in print ArtScene, Vol. 36, No. 10


PAPER MAGAZINE: NSFW THE ART OF THE DICK PICBY EVA SEALOVE

Consider the penis. It's a highly-charged, highly-fraught, highly-symbolic, highly-sexy (to some people, at least) and sometimes a very silly thing to have. Don't freak out, but with the advance of smartphones we are living in the age of, as Dan Savage puts it, the "portable porn factory" in our pocket. A dick, if you've got one or are in the presence of one, has become infinitely replicable in cyberspace. Snap a pic, send it. Solicited or unsolicited (seriously, don't), the ether is swimming in phalluses.

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ART LTD: MAY/JUNE 2017 – IN THE NEWS; CONGRATULATING SANDEEP MUKHERJEE ON HIS GUGGENHEIM FELLOWSHIP BY M. ENHOLM

The Board of Trustees of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced the recipients of the 93rd annual Guggenheim Fellowship awards. Selected from a pool of nearly 3,000 applicants 173 awards were given to a diverse group of scholars, artists, and scientists. Established in 1925, the Foundation has granted more than $350 million in Fellowships to over 18,000 individuals. The 2017 recipients in the Creative Arts/Fine Art include: Derek Boshier, Burkhart Cassils, Mahwish Chishty, Joseph DeLappe, Lesley Dill, Harry Dodge, Eugenio Espinoza, Elana Herzog, Nicholas A. Hill, Byron Kim, Kathe Kim, Jennie Jieun Lee, John W. Love, James Luna, Shari Mendelson, Sandeep Mukherjee (seen above), Paul O’Keeffe, Jefferson Pinder, Hunter Reynolds, Kay Rosen, Paul Rucker, Zinadu Saro-Wiwa, Jeanne Silverthorne, Roy Thurston and Leslie Wayne.

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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: SANDEEP MUKHERJEE RECEIVES THE PRESTIGIOUS 2017 JOHN SIMON GUGGENHEIM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP BY NILOFAR HAJA

Selected among a pool of 3,000 applicants, the Pune-born, Los Angeles-based artist—known for his abstract landscape paintings using acrylic inks and paints on textured surfaces and materials—was selected in the fine arts category.

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HUFFINGTON POST: ADAM ROSS: UNTIL THE END OF THE WORLD BY SHANA NYS DAMBROT

Wim Wenders’ 1991 avant-garde epic Until the End of the World was a globe-spanning tech-infused romance in which a major plot point was the invention of a headset that could record memories in such a way as to then be able to show them to others, bypassing the viewer’s optic nerve and transmitting them whole, complete with images, like films beamed directly into the viewer’s neocortex, such that even a blind person could, in neurological terms, see them. So that happened.

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ART AND CAKE: COLE CASE’S POETIC VISION AT CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY BY GENIE DAVIS 

 “Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt” Cole Case. Chimento Contemporary. Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker.

“Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt” Cole Case. Chimento Contemporary. Photo Credit Kristine Schomaker.

 

At Chimento Contemporary through March 25th, Cole Case’s “Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt” is a beautiful, poetic exhibition of luminous but empty landscapes, Los Angeles scenes that seem to come out of a dream but are created from meticulous observation.

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ARTILLERY MAGAZINE: CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY: COLE CASE BY EVE WOOD

Cole Case is a man obsessed with: airplanes, the night sky, palm trees, runways, depopulated public spaces and his own private plethora of nostalgic memorabilia. Armed with these iconographic signifiers, Case, in his second solo exhibition with Chimento Contemporary, has painted a series of eight gorgeously rendered oil paintings that both commemorate and celebrate the oft ignored public arenas where people conduct the business of their lives. 

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ARTSCENE: RECOMMENDATIONS: COLE CASE CHIMENTO CONTEMPORARY, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA BY GENIE DAVIS

“Everything Was Beautiful, and Nothing Hurt” is a finely wrought example of Cole Case's delicate, terse style. The exhibition’s title is as poetic as the works themselves, taken from a drawing in Kurt Vonnegut’s book "Slaughterhouse 5." Working with landscapes that are primarily desolate, Case’s subjects include beaches, harbors, neighborhoods under flight paths, and seascapes that are barren except for an evocatively-placed palm, a lone freighter, towering airplanes. Eight evocative paintings are joined by a series of works on paper. Viewers see elements of realism and the surreal, a naturalistic style contrasting with a subject matter that is often hauntingly skewed. The ghost of Rousseau inhabits these works. 

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HAMPTONS ARTHUB: CRITIC’S VIEW: FIVE BOOTHS NOT TO MISS AT VOLTA NY THIS YEAR BY CHARLES A. RILEY

 "Mutual Reentanglements 2" by Sandeep Mukherjee. Courtesy of Chimento Contemporary.

"Mutual Reentanglements 2" by Sandeep Mukherjee. Courtesy of Chimento Contemporary.

At the 10th anniversary of VOLTA NY, which kicked off on Wednesday, up-and-coming artists dig into subjects like cultural diversity and immigration, and even Donald Trump’s supposed sex practices, keeping the messages up to the moment. As per the norm, all 96 exhibitors were asked to showcase the work of just one or two artists, making it all the easier to cherrypick the fair’s break-out stars.

Sandeep MukherjeeMutual Reentanglement 2, Chimento Contemporary, Los Angeles


Making its New York fair debut is Los Angeles’s Chimento Contemporary, whose founder, Eva Chimento, says that she “always wanted to do something crazy at an art fair.” That’s what she’s aiming for with her mural installation by Sandeep Mukherjee, who has developed a fascinating technique working with Duralene. This thin polymer, which the artist likens to a “synthetic paper,” hangs on the booth wall in ten five-by-seven-foot sheets, each painted in countless layers of acrylic paint.

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ARTNET®NEWS: CATCH THESE BREAKOUT STARS AT THE VOLTA FAIR BY SARAH CASCONE


LA TIMES: DATEBOOK: A FRANK ROMERO RETROSPECTIVE, MOHOLY-NAGY AT LACMA, ULAY AT THE DEPART FOUNDATION BY CAROLINA A. MIRANDA

This exhibition — the first solo exhibition by the artist at Chimento — brings together eight new oils paintings by an artist who is obsessed with landscape of the decidedly non-pastoral kind — airport flight paths, harbors or sporting arenas.

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ART AND CAKE: WHAT’S HOT IN L.A.? ART EVENTS YOU SHOULD CHECK OUT 

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KIM SCHOENSTADT, SIGHTLINE CONSTRUCTION NO.12, 2015 AT THE LAPIS PRESS.  RECEPTION, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2017, 4PM - 7PM

 Kim Schoenstadt,  Sightline Construction No.12 , 2015, Vinyl and metal bench installation.  Bench: 71 x 23 x 19 ½ inches. Vinyl: 69 ½ x 39 ½ inches

Kim Schoenstadt, Sightline Construction No.12, 2015, Vinyl and metal bench installation.

Bench: 71 x 23 x 19 ½ inches. Vinyl: 69 ½ x 39 ½ inches


THE HUFFINGTON POST: PHOTO L.A. AND MOPLA UNITE JANUARY 12 - 15, 2017 BY KATHY LEONARDO

 Laura London,  Rockstar Moment Series: Rock Star Moment 5 , 2000, Color Photograph, 30” x 30”, Edition of 3

Laura London, Rockstar Moment Series: Rock Star Moment 5, 2000, Color Photograph, 30” x 30”, Edition of 3

 

Photography has become one of the most popular forms of art. Now with photography driven websites such as Instagram, Facebook, etc., the medium has attracted a multitude of new fans, students, and users. photo l.a. has been celebrating the art of photography for the past twenty-six years.

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